Monday, 27 June 2016

On having a brain tumour.....


I'm going to tell you about it; to raise awareness for what is a relatively rare occurrence, and also to explain why it may be many months before I close the book on this.

I had a brain tumour called an Acoustic Neuroma. In the best tradition of medical things, it is also called a Vestibular Schwannoma. 
In the first place, it grows out of the auditory nerve and so fills your ear tubes and makes you gradually deaf. As it grows, so it takes up any space available and often wraps around or grows onto the facial nerve. This makes everything 'novocaine' numb on one side of the face. It hurts eventually, the numbness, just because there's no relief, and it makes you chew your tongue and bite your cheek far too often! Once it's taken on the facial nerve, the only place for it to grow is in any space between the brain and the skull, so it does; and eventually, starts to exert backward pressure on the brain as it makes room for itself. It is ultimately life threatening, but benign. My symptoms progressed over the time I was on the waiting list, but I was so lucky never to experience any pain.

My face and head were numb on my right. I couldn't hear a thing (failing hearing and tingling in my gums drove me to the doctor originally). My walk and balance were awful, but I never fell over. Jan will tell you there were a few times when I would have if she hadn't, as always, been there for me! I walked Mr Dunnit into several hedges, and more than once was accused of drunkeness. Particularly as I was slurring my words like a good 'un! Sometimes, I would let it go because I understand how difficult it is not to judge. Other times, when I was feeling particularly defensive, I would put them right as calmly and clearly as I could. We called it 'dropping the tumour bomb' and only once in the last six months did it elicit an apology from the accuser. Mostly I felt awkward for embarrassing them and would leave immediately. Interesting human beans, aren't we!
a semi-decoy pic; proof that Mr Dunnit really looked after me well

Every medical professional I've met in the last eight months has been superb. They treated it at just the right level for me; urgent enough to put me on a list for surgery, take it very seriously but not scare me, monitor everything until my turn came. And when it did come, treating it as a perfectly routine operation. I should point out that surgery is not always the only treatment, but such was my case. It was a six month long list. I have to say that it's been a long wait. I was so tired by the effort of walking and talking like a drunk, trying to hear in difficult situations, feeling tired ALL of the time and just generally waiting. 

I had a scare in April when my handwriting disappeared....I couldn't write any better than a five year old and that really did distress me; I'm often complimented on my handwriting style and its a greater part of my self identity than I thought. Hubris. I had another scan and they decided that it had grown faster than average. I had just come up to the top of the waiting list, so surgery on 31 May it was.


With permission, we buzzed off to Spain for a week beforehand. It was a great idea to be elsewhere and distracted by non routine things for that last week of waiting. I did not have any pain at all in terms of air pressure and I continue to thank my lucky stars that I haven't really suffered as a result of the tumour. I joined an online support group and it quickly became obvious that I was in the minority when it came to pain and tinnitus. (BANA - British Acoustic Neuroma Association).

The operation took nearly eight hours. I have a U shaped scar, a U on its side, starting level with and behind my earlobe and going round to a finish just behind the top of my ear. I had my hair cut really short while we were in Spain and so the shaved area on my head doesn't really have the impact I think it would have had. 



In the long term, I have work to do; balance exercises. I have to train my brain to accept that it needs to work out what is level balance from one side only. Because of my earlier deafness and imbalance, I had a bit of a head start on that and moving my head wasn't too awful an experience the next day. I gather that for others, the nausea and vertigo can go on for days. Awful. For a few days I took anti-nausea pills, but not for long, the hospital want you to train your brain rather than be treated, so brain training it is! I felt really rough, as you would expect, and very sore. I came home after five days and then spent a week sleeping and hurting. After that, by degrees, things have improved and I'm doing OK. I'm still sleeping, but mostly at night and well into the morning, rather than napping constantly. My balance is good, I can shake my head without losing control of my whereabouts, so the brain is obviously and miraculously learning to adjust.



I am irrevocably deaf on the right and I have palsy on the right of my face. I can't operate my right eye lid enough to close my eye, I have drops and I swear, the purest axle grease type ointment that saves my poor eye hurting from being so dry. In the ultimate 'come hither' look, I tape my eye shut to sleep. Like a lot of things, until you can't, you don't realise how clever and necessary blinking and eye control is! I am drinking everything through a straw, my lips won't 'seal' to prevent dribbling, and actually, eating certain foods is erm, messy. I have facial physio and balance physio slated. I cannot fault my treatment, the hospital, facilities and particularly the care from the staff. 

The ENT and Brain guys say it will be 3 months before I'm post op enough to think about getting back to a routine of more than light housework and such. This is worst case, I'm already doing more than I expected to be able to - all in short bursts, but still, it's progress. 

The facial palsy people say that what I get back in the first three months will be pretty much how it will be for me. Over all, they all say to allow 18 months for the new normal to embed. It is all a challenge - who wouldn't hate this palsy, especially. But Mr Dunnit says he's staying anyway, my friends are still my friends and now I have physical evidence of illness, even strangers are being kind.  So, I'll be bringing on the new normal. First, a nap.

72 comments:

Jane Hirst said...

Sending a massive hug and I hope you get better very soon xx

Love Jane xx

Jane Hirst said...

Sending a massive hug and I hope you get better very soon xx

Love Jane xx

Diane said...

You have been through a terrible time, but you seem very matter of fact and positive, which is wonderful. I really hope that you regain everything as soon as possible. Rest and excercises will be very important for you in the short term, I am sure you will be a good girl and do everything you are told. Here is wishing you a very quick recovery.

Helen said...

thank you for being brave enough to write such an honest "review" of your story so far... I hope that your recovery continues apace, (but don't be tempted to do too much...it sounds as if you can't anyway but I am sure it will get tempting as you improve!) It does all sound horrendous, but then you think how much worse it could be. so I send you love and hugs and look forward to hearing of your achievements as things come back to normal (which is highly over-rated!) xxx lots of love Helen

voodoo vixen said...

I am so glad you have decided to tell your tale, not just to inform, but to let us know what you have and are continuing to go through. I admire your spirit and if anyone can, then I know that you will get back as much, if not more than expected function, and no matter what, we will love you just as much and wait for your nuggets of humour and wisdom as always.

Annie said...

As Helen said...thank you for sharing that all with us. It's been a worrying time at a distance not knowing how things were with you and as you will know we all have been wishing you well and hoping for a full recovery for you. Keep doing all you are advised and I really do hope things improve as well as is possible....we really do love you just the way you are but want the best for you.
Sending you lots of love and hugs.
Annie xxxx

Belinda Basson said...

Good grief! I go AWOL for a year and look what has been going on! So sorry to see this. You are at least keeping your good sense of humour I am pleased to read. Thankfully your family and friends are being supportive because the various things you describe sound quite hard for you to cope with. I am not sure if I would manage with half of what you talk about here. Lots of love and hugs from across the miles.

Twiglet said...

Sending you a big get well hug - you are amazing and I know you will do everything in your power to get your life back on track. If we can help at all just shout up. Love and best wishes. x Jo

Peg Robinson said...

Well I would say you've been put through the ringer my dear. I will hope and pray that things start turning around and you gain some strength and balance You have a lot of good friends and they are all thinking about you Hugz.

Shaz Brooks said...

Hi Julia,wow, that was quite a read. Well done for writing about it, I think it's great if we can dispel even a little of the fear surrounding these problems. So cool to hear your sense of humour is still working fine, it's the one thing that keeps us sane( those of us that are, the little voices are arguing in the corner in my case). I think the transition from daytime naps to sleeping one long marathon is good, I know I was starting to feel like a 3 year old, always having Doug holding my hand for balance e, having to hold the handle of the trolley in the supermarket, and having afternoon naps! Just take your time and focus always on how far you've come, not how far you have to go. In a while, when you are up to having visitors, we'd love to come down and see you.xxxx

Shaz Brooks said...

Hi Julia,wow, that was quite a read. Well done for writing about it, I think it's great if we can dispel even a little of the fear surrounding these problems. So cool to hear your sense of humour is still working fine, it's the one thing that keeps us sane( those of us that are, the little voices are arguing in the corner in my case). I think the transition from daytime naps to sleeping one long marathon is good, I know I was starting to feel like a 3 year old, always having Doug holding my hand for balance e, having to hold the handle of the trolley in the supermarket, and having afternoon naps! Just take your time and focus always on how far you've come, not how far you have to go. In a while, when you are up to having visitors, we'd love to come down and see you.xxxx

BJ said...

WOW Julia, what an amazing post, thanks for sharing the nitty gritty with a dash of humour added in for good measure. I pray that you brain will recover far more than expected in the coming three months. Hugs BJ

peggy gatto said...

Love you and pray for a quick and steady recovery!

Morti said...

Nap away my dear, and heal thyself. Time we have aplenty, and we're all just jolly glad you're here.... Much love to you and Mr D

pearshapedcrafting said...

This must have taken some strength to share this -I hope you had a good nap! Glad to read that you are on a road to recovery and as others have already said....don't overdo things! My friend's son in law had an acoustic neuroma and found being looked after quite difficult! Thinking of you, hugs, Chrisx

Hels Sheridan said...

Thinking of you and yours Julia, what you have been through and continue to go through is unimaginable. Sending you a big hug and I hope you continue to recover from your ordeal very speedily xx

Judys Lace Creations said...

heart-felt wishes on your continuing journey towards health.Just imagine people who had this tumour in times past. Almost every day I thank our luck for living in an age where medical miracles happen.I have 2 new metal knees, and being able to walk pain free is something I don't take for granted.
Your story did make me shiver, but I am glad you shared your story.The brain training after such surgery, and for people who have had strokes is one of the new frontiers of modern medicine I reckon.
Love and best wishes.
Judy xx

Bleubeard and Elizabeth said...

Thank you for sharing this in both scientific as well as lay terms. The scientist in me was thrilled to read the technical and the friend in me was delighted to read your humor was still showing through.

I have always loved your handwriting, so was horrified to read you couldn't write properly. But of course, regardless, we all still love you for YOU, whether you run us into a hedge or the kitchen cabinet.

BTW, I had no doubt whatsoever that Mr. D. will be around for LIFE. He's your rock, and Jan is your steady companion. So glad to read that there is truly a possibly positive outcome to all this.

Vickster said...

Thank you so much for sharing your experience. You are a wonderful, beautiful human "bean"...:) I send you much love. Thank you again for your words and sharing your creativity.

Angie said...

You are so brave to cope with all this....and write to clearly what has happened to you ...I am so pleased that you have such a strong group of friend to help you cope....and a great husband ....I know you will improve to the top limit because you are an awesome lady ....I wish you all the best and send you huge hugs xxAngie ...aka Shozzy

Darnell J Knauss said...

Thank you for sharing with us, Julia! Of course we would all hate the palsy and understand you hating it. Try to think of it like I do my rather ginormous rearend: I can't see it unless I look in a mirror, so ergo forthwith, it doesn't bother me.

You have tons of people praying for you and sending positing vibes that these normal tasks that we all take for granted will come back to you soon. One thing you don't mention is that your written articulation is as wonderful as it ever was! What a blessing that is! Losing that witty, brilliant, sharp, and often naughty way of thinking would have been a terrible loss. I'm so thankful you still have those attributes! And Mr. Dunnit, bless him! You picked a true mate there, Missus! I think you're remarkable and I'm so looking forward to meeting you and Jan!! Love and hugs, Darnell

Jo.C said...

I admire you so much for sharing this today and I am so glad you have had your operation and it has been successful. Your attitude is so good in such difficult circumstances and I know this won't always have been the case. I haven't been reading any blogs recently but something prompted me to scroll down and I'm so pleased I did. Wishing you all the best and a continued recovery xx

misteejay said...

I am so glad to hear that you are recovering well and I'm sure that you will pass all expectations.
Sharing this will have been a real eye opener to many and will hopefully create more understanding of the condition.
Thinking of you and sending (((hugs)))
Toni xx

Sue said...

(((Julia))) WOW!!! What a strong lady you are to deal with all of this. Good job I wasn't with you the times someone decided it was their right to voice their opinion on why you looked/walked the way you did. By heck they would have got a few choice words from me:)

With all your family and friends, including us deskers thinking of you and sending you positive healing thoughts, you have no choice but to get better.

You take care.
Huge Hugs
Sue

Cardarian said...

Dear Julia! Thank you for explaining it all and also I must say you are an amazingly brave women. Who would want to loose such a lovely friend over looks. It is the heart that matters. I would love to stay your frind if you will have me! Love and a big hug from D.

Jill said...

Very brave of you to share your story and wishing you a speedy recovery.
Jill

Cara said...

Sending hugs, I hope you continue to make a good recovery. Lots of love Cara x

Cara said...

Sending hugs. I hope you continue to make a good recovery. Sending lots of love Cara x

StampinCarol said...

Your post was very informative and helpful in knowing about these kinds of tumors! And my prayers go out for you for a faster-than-expected recovery. Though I have never met you and probably never will, please accept my cyber-hug! God bless you!
Carol N (a desker)

Linda Harris said...

Wishing you all the best with your recovery and I'm glad you are receiving all the care and information you need to work your way back to health.

Princess Judy Palmer said...

First the nap! Then you'll conquer the world.

It sounds like you gotten it pretty well conquered now. I appreciate your sharing this with us. I'm sure it took some doing. And it will take some doing to get used to the new you.

Keep on keeping on, gal!

Monica said...

Oh Julia, You are so brave. That is horrendous. I never thought anything could be as bad as Menieres Disease. we share many of the same symptoms but Menieres has no obvious physical cause. well none they have found yet. Tinnitus, deafness, loss of balance all make life hard at times. After a while I found I did not care what"those" people thought. There are always thoughtful and caring friends.
SO happy to hear your op is a success and you are progressing. It does take time for everything to heal and reorganize itself in the body. There are days when I have to recite"never give up, Never give in, If you're determined you're sure to win. lots of positive thoughts and hugs heading your way. And give that special man an extra hug.
Monica

Chrissie said...

What an articulate and informative narrative Julia, it helps to understand what you have been and are going through and I just wish you well and with your family's support I'm sure you'll progress as well as possible!
Sending healing thoughts! Xxxx

Neet said...

Sending lots of love and gentle hugs. This was painful to read and so I will come back another time to read and take it in.
Lots of Love
Neet xx

Patsy Paterno said...

Dearest Julia, I am so glad you are better, and will get better still in the next few months. I am sure with your good humor and positive outlook (which is the best medicine!) you will be as right as you can be sooner than soon. Sounds devastating actually and I know much about taking ordinary things for granted and the lessons we learn when those ordinary things are taken away!You can depend on me for prayers for a quick recovery. So glad you were spared the pain! patsy

Angela Radford said...

Hi Julia well done! You have as many naps as you like girl and get well soon. Love Angela x

Neet said...

Not a clue what happened to my comment so here I am again.
Thank you for sharing such intimate thoughts with us all and for making us aware of the problems you and others have encountered along the way. Remember you are loved by so many and if prayer can help you will improve day by day.
A hard read, can only begin to imagine what it must have taken to write it all down, thank you.
Love, Neet xx

Jackie Mackay said...

Wow - you have really been through the mill but it is of some comfort to know that you had such a lot of lovely people batting for your side. Now it's a day at a time with each one hopefully getting better than the one before. Love and prayers x Jackie 14

Kyla said...

Fabulous read and as you know I am in awe of your coping ability. To raise awareness is a great idea as who'd have thought tingling gums and hearing loss may indicate that.

Slow and steady girl, you will get there and well done for accepting some help as I doubt that was easy ☺

Kathyk said...

Great to read your upbeat post which will inspire many just embarking on your journey. I hope for the best possible outcome for you.

Happy WOYWW ... and enjoy that nap!

Kathyk
#16

Deb's Pen Pot said...

Such an articulate, evocative and moving account of what's happened to you, Julia - and delivered with that dash of warm wit we know and love you for! (Well done for keeping your good humour - life and rude people make this hard, the damn things!) Am glad to hear you're on the road to recovery - lots of luck and best wishes with the journey. Cherish and celebrate the small victories and pleasures in each day - and tell yourself "Well done" constantly, because you deserve it! Accepting and managing my illness has taught me to be kinder (to myself, mainly - never had trouble being kind to others!), more tolerant and more open about the things I need (time and space to rest, to 'decompress' after outings/events, to first notice and second enjoy the small things) - and I'm sure you're benefitting from these things too. Lots of love and best wishes, Deb xxx (debspenpot - lapsed member of the WOYWW tribe, but with you all in spirit!)

April Story said...

You are so strong and so lucky to have such a faithful group. I know you're going to be just fine. :-) And know that we are all praying for you and love you lots.
April

Marit said...

You brave woman you!!! Thanks for the update, it helps not only me but all people to understand what you were/are going through. And the brain is such a powerful organ, to be able to adapt to a new situation when you train it. You must have an especially wonderful brain, if only because you started woyww once and made us all happy with your wonderful blog and posts. I send you healing waves and a big hug from Holland! Marit

Diana Taylor said...

So pleased to see you are getting much better, and it was a brave and informative post, which I'm sure will help many people understand the illness better. Keep getting stronger and I hope when you are further along the recovery route we can meet up again.
Sorry I'm so naff at words - I can never get the right words for the right feelings but please know I'm thinking of you and sending you love and hugs - Diana x

Sandy Leigh said...

That tumor was a nasty thing and look at you go girl--battling it head on, training your brain, being creative anyway, and crafting your own new normal. This is all because you don't have the average brain--that freakin' tumor had no idea who it was dealing with! And I have a feeling your recovery will be the exceptional one. It is quite a thing as we are in our fifties to deal with physical things--my diabetes and eye problem are hidden illnesses right now that most people who meet me have no idea what I deal with every day--and so we go on, each day, finding our joy, our blessings, and getting on with our wonderful creativity that gets us through anything. I think of you often, say prayers for your recovery, and I'm always blessed by you and the friendships you have brought to me with WOYWW. Hugs! Wish I could share a cuppa with you! Sandy Leigh

Claire Grantham said...

Julia, thank you for the explanation of what you have been through. You are quite something. It takes a certain kind of person to cope with this kind of thing (my Momma was here 2years ago) I am sure the new normal will take some getting used to, but you seem to be mentally adjusting and coping. Happy, sunny thoughts from me to you. Cx

Ginny Maxam said...

Hi Julia! I've been MIA for a few months and came back to your blog to read this. Oh My, I will certainly keep you in my prayers for a full and speedy recovery. What an ordeal to go through. I am glad that they are able to treat you and the prognosis is good. Sending a big hug
Ginny M

dmgarafalo said...

Thank you so much for sharing, I had no idea of this tumour. Remember God never gives us more than we can handle. (I wish he didn't realize some of us are so strong sometimes), Maybe its our art that allows us to keep on going. Speedy recovery. Blessings, Donna #9

MaggieC (Silvercrafter) said...

A very big hug and thank you for sharing your experience with us to give us some understanding. xxx Maggie

Sylvia/LittleTreasures said...

Thank you Julia for the update and information on all that has happened. I will continue prayers for a quick and easy return to "as you were" type of recovery. I know that continued success comes from "DOING".. My BIL made huge improvements from a major stroke, just by intensely exercising that side of his body. Day after Day and always a smile.
Again, wishing you the very best, keep that intense personality and lots of Hugs to you.

AliWade said...

Thank you for all of those words. So interesting to read about something that I had never heard of. I am glad that you are getting the care and rest you need. Ali x

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing the factual information about your condition. What an amazing recovery you are making and I wish you well as you progress in the days to come. Catriona

creativitybyangenita said...

I hope your recovery goes well and you get back all your functions.
It is good to see you feel well enough to read posts and leave comments. But take it easy and don't over do it.
Thank you for this post. I'll be thinking twice when I see a drunk on an unexpected place.

Shoshi said...

Oh Julia, what a time you have had, and are continuing to have... and this tumour was benign too! It certainly doesn't sound benign in its effects... Thank you for sharing so fully what has been going on so that we know a bit more and I wish you all the very best for continued recovery, and that you get as much back as possible. Having gone through the malignant variety and done so well and with so few complications, it does make me think, and count my blessings. The recovery period is long and slow and when you start feeling better the temptation is to do too much too soon but I am sure you will be more sensible than I was at times!

I hope that there is plenty of support available to you through the recovery period, not just on the physical side, but on the emotional side too. I am currently attending a "Moving On After Cancer" course which addresses this. Well done Mr. D. - he sounds like my hubby - we are so fortunate to have such wonderful hubbies to look after us, aren't we. They are the unsung heroes and deserve a medal. It's very hard for them and they are always there for us.

I have been alternately very busy and very tired lately and not able to spend much time creating so have rather neglected WOYWW so I'm a bit out of touch. I have been thinking about you and wondering how things were going.

I was delighted when I saw your comment on LLJ's blog and thought I must pop over and visit and wish you well. Lovely to see you posting again.

Take care of yourself, and a big hug from
Shoshi xx

Nikki C said...

Sending Hugs your way may you recover quicker then they say and thanks for visiting me hugs Nikki

Arnoldo L. Romero, MLA said...

Bless your heart. I didn't realize your surgery had been this serious. I will continue to pray for a quick and full recovery, so that you can be back to all your creative endeavors. The casserole that your husband made for you looks delicious, so I can tell he's been a blessing for you. Take care my dear friend, and may the peace of the Lord be with you.

Sofie Vandersmissen said...

You are very brave to tell your story. I'm sorry to hear what you are going through. I hope you get better soon.

Thanks for visiting my blog!

Greetings, Sofie
http://sofie-s-world.blogspot.be

Shaz in Oz.CalligraphyCards said...

I am sorry I am slow at catching up on things...

...thank you so very much for writing this post Julia it must've been very hard, and certainly worthy of several naps.. however insight is good as it helps us to understand and to be considerate of others. I thinking the palsy of Bells Palsy which may or may not pass too, must be little like the facial issues.

You are right about visible disability being understood better than and invisible one, I have found that. the brain is amazing so will pray in and trust that the new you is soon back with brighter hopes for the future.
every blessing for every day ahead..one moment a time,
Oh, and a huge congrats to Mr Dunnit a mighty fine potato bake there too!
Gentle hugs, dear Julia,
Shaz in Oz.x

{Shaz in Oz – Calligraphy Cards}

Susanne said...

Oh bless you. That sounds like quite a worrisome thing to have waited for, experienced and recover from. I stopped and said a prayer that your recovery is excellent in every aspect. Do consider yourself hugged! Susanne

Sharon Madson said...

I had no idea what it was all about! Thank you for the detailed explanation. Hugs & prayers!

Kelly said...

So thrilled to hear from you, Julia. I can not imagine the road you have traveled thus far, nor the journey yet ahead. But you are here and you are gaining ground on this horrid little creature that tried to take control. Do as you can, rest when you must and tell Mr. Dunnit I think he is a very smart man ;-) Hugs & Healing Blessings! Kelly #32

Along The Road Arts said...

Julia, you are an inspiration! Thank you for sharing your story first-hand. I am a friend of your sis, Stephanie, in the US. She has shared your journey with us and I am so happy to know that you have had your surgery and are on the road to recovery. Know that you are surrounded by love across the pond!

Sharon Koole said...

Julia, sending HUGE hugs your way!

CraftygasheadZo said...

Am so glad you have shared this - and I'm so glad you are on the road to recovery. Any tumour is scary. I think you have handled it so well. Learning to deal with balance issues, facial problems and slurred words are something I can empathise with as I'm experiencing similar with my conditions. I often freak people out with it all. Family and friends are so important and like you, I have them. Take it steady my friend. Each day celebrate the little things. Sending you much love and hugs. Take care Zo xx

Zue said...

Wishing you well, Julia.
You have opened my eyes to something I had not heard of.
I will be thinking of you lots and wishing you the very best recovery.
Sue xxxx

Robyn said...

dear Brave amazing julia,
thanks you so much for sharing will all of us, especially me- so frightened of being alone and experiencing devastation illness.
If and when it comes, may i remember your courage, my friends and that things do turn out all right!
Continued prayers and healing Light to all
Blessings,
Robyn

Quietfire said...

A big huge hug to you, sweetie! Thanks for sharing your story. So happy to hear your sense of humour is just fine! Go gently during your recovery.

Lynn Holland said...

Life can be a bit of a bugger at times as I'm finding out. I want to send a gentle hug to you as I don't want to knock you over with my full weight haha.
Thank you for sharing your story with us Julia, you are one hell of a gutsy lady.
I'll send Mr D a big hug as like my other half he is a star
Love Lynn xxx

Zsuzsa Karoly-Smith said...

Best wishes on your road to recovery and finding your new "normal", Julia. It was quite sobering to read your account. Thank you for sharing your story and raising awareness about this condition.

Stacy Sheldon said...

This was the most cohesive post I have ever read about a medical condition and the being on the inside of it Julia. ( I am not much of a word person but, I love to read) (( Hugs )) what I am wondering about is the deafness part.

because, I am deaf. and in 2008 & 2009 I had cochlear implant surgery. which gives you hearing through a sound processor that looks like a big hearing aid out side on your ear and has a fiber optic wire on the inside that hooks up to the audio nerves inside your brain. so, what I am wondering is if it is even remotely possible they could do that for you on the deaf side later. The hardest part of being deaf on one side is the loss of direction for where the noise comes from.

just wanted you to know you are in my prayers even when I don't stop by to tell you.
~Stacy

Hazel said...

I had no idea because I haven't been in to look for WOYWW for weeks, months ... so I didn't know anything about your tumour. My heart goes out to you and I hope and pray that each day brings a step nearer to normality for you. I just came by your blog tonight because I thought it was about time I tried joining in again with WOYWW (we moved in September and that rather interrupted things and all the things we needed to do once we got here ... and still wanting to have a proper craft sort out ... but getting there). Sorry, I'm rambling, but so glad I caught up with your news (although obviously so sorry to hear it). Sending you much love and hugs. xx

okienurse said...

I am glad to hear you are on the mend. It has been a similar year for me…always something new and challenging. When I had the face cancer that spread to the bone in my skull it was an experience I don't want to redo. I was told that if I didn't start doing something within a time period I probably wouldn't get it back. Example was the headaches, face palsy, balance issues etc. but I still see some improvement from time to time and my surgery was in 2010. Hang in there Julia…it does get better as evidenced by the physical manifestation of your illness causing people to be more kind! I still have problems not going off on them and ripping a strip of hide off them when they make fun of something I say or do!