Friday, 14 August 2015

...and then I painted a bridge.

See these? They are lengths of Beech that once were square. Mr Dunnit made them round and then called in his apprentice (me).  I measured the required length and cut them on the skill saw. It's a noisy and ferocious saw and I'm a bit scared of it, but when you're doing repetitive work, I think that's a very good thing. 

 And this was the most repetitive job I've done so far.

In fact, by the time I'd cut all 371 of them, I was ready to stop! Each peg now has to undergo 2 more procedures. One end needs to be chamfered to make it slightly less edgy and sharp. The other end has to be reduced by a few mm so that it will fit in a pre-determined hole size. That we've already drilled. So you see why it was all feeling a bit tedious! So Mr Dunnit suggested a break, do something else for a while. Good idea. 

 So I painted a bridge.
Believe me when I say that these slightly less ordinary jobs have a habit of finding us...

11 comments:

Annie said...

How rewarding is the snap of the finished bucket of pegs Julia.....I love it and as for that bridge......I want one [but only have a building site to put it in lol].
Hugs,
Annie x

Peg Robinson said...

Now I want a bridge. I'm always love these and also want a koi pond. oh yes and some lovely Asian iris on the banks. Oh and lily pads love lily pads. Can you see where my mind is headed.

Bleubeard and Elizabeth said...

Ah, the life of a factory worker. I remember those days, only we worked in metal. Thankfully, I measured and inspected each step, then also inspected the final assembly. Your bridge leads to nowhere, but it leads to a fun post, at least.

I had planned to visit WOYWW this week, but I learned Tuesday evening my friend Kathy was coming early Wednesday morning. I can't stay up all night and entertain the next day without sleep. Something had to give and it wasn't Kathy because I hadn't sen her since late April. I'll be back next week, though.

Twiglet said...

Well done you - what a job! But I do love that little bridge. x Jo

Shaz Brooks said...

Hi Julia, totally with you on being scared, lol. We make bolts for aircraft, and grinding them to size involves placing a metal bolt in between two spinning wheels, one of which is effectively stone, and weighing up to 16 stone, so you can tell how big it is. fear of losing your fingers makes you very, very careful!
You could make tiny 'fairy bridges' out of scraps- they'd sell like hot cakes! Love and hugs, Shaz xxx

Krisha said...

You are certainly a woman of MANY talents!
That bridge is a beauty, did you paint it a color? ....or just varnished it?

Sue said...

Loving the bridge.

Hope you have a lovely weekend ahead. sue

misteejay said...

What a lovely little bridge.
Well done on getting all your spindles cut.
Toni xx

Helen said...

What a day you had... the idea of big machinery scares me, I don't even drill holes in walls to put pictures up!
I love Shaz's idea of fairy bridges in miniature...

Kelly said...

Will he come build me one? I promise to feed you both very well and you have free reign in my new studio... as long as you clean up when you're done ;-)

Princess Judy Palmer said...

I think it all sounds fun.... well, until you mentioned that you had to do 371 of them. That's a bit excessive!