Sunday, 8 November 2009

Lest We Forget...

I'm an Army brat. I wonder if that can still be applied to me at this tender age of forty-something. The brat part possibly. My fine, upstanding father served in the British Army for well over 20 years. This morning of all mornings my teeny genetic connection to the Army is thrown into high relief and I join everyone else on Remembrance Sunday to do just that - remember and honour. It's not just my background that makes me do it, the upbringing certainly, and a real sense of pride in my nationality, which has crept up on me as I've aged. You learn about the role of the Armed Forces through history lessons and stories told. I live very near and work in a large Garrison town, my life is affected by the comings and goings of soldiers and their families. And because of my horrormones probably, I'm deeply affected by the respect and ceremony that surrounds our Act of Remembrance today. Now I'm a mother, I have to say that I'm more affected by the potential of war, horror and loss. During the Falklands Campaign I was a teenager and felt sympathy and political frustration. Nowadays I feel empathy and fear and political frustration. So today, take a mo, and think on - it doesn't matter if your politics match, what matters is that there are still good men and women being lost, as there have been in previous generations. If you serve, I salute you.

14 comments:

Wipso said...

Living next door to a soldier who is out in Afghanistan and doing my best to support his young wife and daughter it all feels very personal to me this year. It is such a terrible loss of young life. A x

helen miles said...

amen jules x

Angie said...

My thoughts used to be for those who lost their lives in WWII but now I think of all those who are loosing their lives in action ... or just on guard ... now ...and to the families who wait and wonder if their loved one will be next. War is so futile as there never is a true winner ...they used to say it was the side that had the least losses ...I always felt that it was the first to back down , that lost ...for what ever reason but I fear that no one will back away in these currrent conflicts.

I salute those brave men fighting out there but I would have such respect for the person who said 'enough is enough' and whoses actios might result in peace .... alas I think that is just wishful thinking.

Ann said...

I have no connection with the armed forces except for my father who was drafted in the Second World War. But I do remember all those who serve our Country at this time of year, and in the past few years, more often than that, as our soldiers come under fire in Afghanistan and Iraq. The Cenotaph was built to remember The War Of All Wars and to ensure it never happened again. Sadly that dream has never happened.

Carmen said...

I can only echo what everyone else has said. It's all so senseless and can't comprehend what it must be like for those who are fighting for us at the moment. I have to agree with Angie about the wishful thinking.

Linda Elbourne said...

Here Here Julia

Anne said...

Here here. I went to the ceremony at our local war memorial this morning, and it was incredibly moving. I've no personal links to the forces, but a couple of years ago I went, by chance, to the Menin Gate in Belgium. And I was thinking this morning that that place changed me forever. Very, very moving.

Jay said...

I've nothing more to add, but I just wanted to say I'm thinking of all who have lost their lives and their families.

Fiona Whitehead said...

Here Here Julia - my husband's father served in WWII and he was on our minds this morning. He's my only real link to the armed forces but I applaud them for what they do for us - lest we forget indeed.

allyf said...

Eloquently put as usual matey. Definately a point close to my heart since I work with the forces.
:-)

Charlie said...

Well said - for the first time this year Denmark had a special day (Sept. 5th) for those serving abroad after WW2. We always celebrated May 4th which is the day we were liberated and remembered those lost in that war. About time we got a day for the more recent heroes too. I lost my nephew to PTSD 13 years ago - he served 3 times in Kosovo and this sadly killed his spirit and ruined his life. My DH retired from the Danish RAF 5 years ago - I salute your "guys" today.

redsmudge said...

Perfect words for a worthy cause! Salute every single one of them today, whether with us or in memory! Their bravery will never be forgotten!

LadyBug said...

Being brought up a Navy Brat I to have strong feelings about rememberance and armistice day. It seems a sad fact that as a race (the human one that is) we are unable to live in peace for any length of time. It is always the soliders and their families that pay the price.

Lyn said...

My DF, imminently 85, lied about his age to join the Navy in WW2. We came across some old Navy documentation a while ago and for the question "complexion" the handwritten answer was "fresh faced"! I have always bought a poppy and remember the 1985 Rememberance Sunday and subsequent ones for an entirely different reason - it was the day my son was born! To my real pleasure, one of my favourite ATCs is a poppy with "Lest we forget" from our Julia herself :D